A Travellerspoint blog

Dead bodies and culture. A typical day in Moscow

Lenin and museums. Day with no night.

sunny 23 °C

Moscow, Russia

With the remaining train tickets collected we start our day at Lenin’s Mausoleum. Open for only 3 hours each day and with strict security, regards not allowing cameras in the area, we join the relatively short queue to view the founder of the Soviet state. The embalmed leader has laid here since 1924. Whilst we appear to be on a conveyor belt of tourists, filing past his resting place, it feels slightly ghoulish to view the well preserved oddly waxy figure. Yet few tourists seem concerned or overly respectful. Security is complete though with both uniformed and plain clothes officers guarding the body. Emerging from the red and black stone tomb we decipher sufficient Cyrillic or recognize the associated statue of the final resting places of Stalin, Brezhnev, and Andropov – the remaining tombstones being unknown to us.

Lenin's Mausoleum

Lenin's Mausoleum

As we continue to try and understand more of the Cyrillic language we are constantly reminded of an Agatha Christie murder where the ‘H’ on a handkerchief actually belongs to a Russian with the initial ‘N’ as ‘H is written as N in the Cyrillic alphabet’. Writing this Blog en route to Yekaterinburg one is pulled even more into ‘Murder on the Orient Express’. Whilst the ‘luxurious’ accommodation is in no way comparable the sight of a mustachioed man would cause reason for concern. Yet I digress. Our Trans-Siberian train journey is a little time away, yet.

Red Square

Red Square

With our train departing late the following evening we planned to spend the evening at the Ballet and then depart for Siberia and eastern Russia. ??? Theatre promised a performance of Swan Lake the following evening and so we found ourselves at their Box Office, pointing at posters of a Ballerina with the date marked as 30 (with an undecipherable month alongside it) we were able to purchase tickets for what we could not 100%, but were confident was a performance of Swan Lake. Certainly, it was by Tchaikovsky. With tickets for this performance running to over 100 USD on the internet we were pleasantly surprised at securing tickets for 10 USD. Our evening, the following day, was now planned.

The imposing GUM department store in Red Square

The imposing GUM department store in Red Square

Eager to explore outside of Red Square we headed for Iskusstv Park. Crossing the Moscow River, over the Krymsky bridge we could see the rollercoaster’s and fairground rides of Gorky Park to our right and the towering, New Tretyakov museum - an ugly Soviet style building that houses a premier 20th-century Russian art collection.

Wondering along the river a plethora of artists presented a large variety of paintings. The majority were hideous, ghastly faux landscapes that are the scourge of many cheap hotel rooms. Yet amongst these mass produced images a few choice pieces were available. However, priced at crazy levels we did not partake and retired to the old Red October candy factory, which now serves as gallery and studio space. Yet with even sillier prices here we sought out a roof top terrace bar to take in the vista of Moscow. As we sat down to our extremely expensive cocktails, in a bar that would probably become far too trendy to allow us in later that evening, the promised thunderstorm arrived. A veritable deluge saw waiters scurrying for cushions and furniture as the outdoor terrace fast became an open-air swimming pool.

Trey and the Moscow River

Trey and the Moscow River

With the storm passed and evening fast approaching we found ourselves, eventually, in the Chistye Prudy suburb of the city. Here a courtyard café, Art Garbage, promised and delivered live music, good food and local art. Sustained by an excellent meal and a welcome beer it was still light when we returned to our hotel, close to midnight. For once again we were back in the land of the long days and as was had seen previously the nightlife seemed to extend to the amount of daylight available. The pavements awash with late night, but apparently sober, revelers we return to our hotel for our last night in a stationary bed for nearly a week.

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Cathedral of Christ the Saviour

Posted by jamesh1066 12:57 Archived in Russia Comments (0)

Onto Moscow and the massed tourist hordes of Red Square

Our last flight, before Beijing, to get there and very pleasant it was too

sunny 30 °C

Chişinău, Moldova – Moscow, Russia

Taken back to the airport by the Hertz rental car agent the One World airline we were flying, S7, sounded more like a girl band than the operator of an extensive flight network throughout Russia and neighboring countries. Indeed, their advertising proudly bore that they had the most extensive network of any Russian carrier.

Arriving at check-in our respective Emerald and Sapphire status within the One World family has us treated as veritable rock stars, just without the groupies! A private escort through security and a special VIP bus to take just the two of us to the airplane, whilst the massed hordes crowded onto large purpose built buses, had us wondering how pleasant the service would have been if we had been travelling business class and not the heavily discounted economy tickets, that we were. On board the CSD (Cabin Services Director) introduced herself and did all she could to ensure we had the pleasant flight the whole team wanted. With S7 being the newest member of One World but having flown on all the One World airlines the remainder could learn a huge amount, in generating customer loyalty, by copying S7s treatment of passengers.

After a pleasant flight passport control at Domodedovo airport could only be described as a free-for-all scrum. Suddenly, thankful of the passenger organization at large airports all over the world the Russian authorities appeared to have decided that these simple measures, the prudent use of a few posts and rope were not required. In their place 300 plus people, most recently arrived from a variety of –stans, Azerbaijan, Tajikistan and Kazakhstan, simply pushed and shoved for the attention of a handful of immigration officials. Periodically, a sternly suited official would shout at everyone, forcing the crowd back. For some time we remained at the rear of this throng of people. Unused to pushing and the lack of order we were a little outside of our area of expertise.

Finally, accepting that the situation was not improving and wondering if the best cause of action might be to throw a handful of dollar bills in the opposite direction of the immigration booths I flashed my UK passport at an official, near the rear of the hall. He immediately gestured that we should go upstairs to the section marked ‘Russian and Belarus nationals only’. The upper hall proved to be the haven of tranquility we had sought. The expected, western, queuing system was in place but hardly required for the handful of passengers that were using it. We were soon through immigration, bags collected and on our way into Moscow.

To avoid the ridiculous taxi fares of 100 USD, plus we opted for the Aeroexpress train into Moscow. This was straightforward, cheap and comfortable. From there the Metro would take us to our hotel. Yet with all signs posted in Cyrillic, only and maps of the Metro being limited to one per station or so it appeared we had more than a little fun figuring both the line and platform we required. Once on board our only option for determining our station was to count stops with announcements being made in Russian and no station platforms being marked with the name of the station on arrival, which would have been nice!

One of the many ornate Metro stations in Moscow

One of the many ornate Metro stations in Moscow

Yet, without getting lost or too confused we arrived at our hotel, checked in and soon prepared to explore the city with what time we had left. With tickets to collect for later stages of our Trans-Manchurian journey we completed administration tasks before heading for the classic Moscow sight – Red Square.

In Red Square

In Red Square

Surrounded by relatively mundane, Soviet style buildings and extensive road systems, which appear to be used as both car parks and travel routes simultaneously, Red Square is an oasis of spectacular sights in the centre of this sprawling, perpetually moving city. Our first surprise on reaching the square were the marauding packs of tourist taking their tour guide led trips around the sights. Whilst these had been a familiar sight in the Baltic’s our last two countries had not been the tourist magnets that clearly Red Square was. During our time in Moscow we were to see these tour groups passing through the square at 11pm at night, a sight I cannot remember seeing in any other major tourist city before.

St. Basil's Cathedral

St. Basil's Cathedral

Our second, not unexpected surprise, was the price of entry to the museums and the sights of Red Square. 15 USD seemed the starting rate, raising to nearly 50 USD for the Kremlin. Not without reason is Moscow labeled the most expensive city in the world.

Trey begins her protest in Red Square

Trey begins her protest in Red Square

Yet, with evening approaching we decided upon a tour of that classic Moscow sight, St. Basil’s cathedral. The crazy confusion of shapes and colors is a constant sight in Red Square. This ultimate symbol of Russia was created between 1555 and 1561 to celebrate the capture of Kazan by Ivan the Terrible. The misnomer ‘St Basil’s’ actually refers only to the northeastern chapel, which was added later.

Inside St. Basil's

Inside St. Basil's

A second church within St. Basil's

A second church within St. Basil's

Inside, each of the domes of the cathedral essentially house a chapel dedicated to a saint that, usually, inspired victory in some long distant battle. No longer a practicing church, the museum, houses fresh and vibrant frescoes and murals that impress, even after the many similar style churches that we have visited on this trip, to date. Visiting in the evening the tourist hordes are minimal and at times we are able to enjoy an entire church to ourselves.

Overlooking Red Square

Overlooking Red Square

Outside the Bolshoy Moskvoretsky bridge takes us across the Moscow River for a classic view of the Kremlin and Red Square.

Lenin and Stalin enjoy a drink by the fountain

Lenin and Stalin enjoy a drink by the fountain

With pictures taken and twilight fast approaching we return to our trusted Metro and head to north of the city, tracking down a recommended patisserie…for research purposes only, you understand.

A brief stop on our exploration of Moscow

A brief stop on our exploration of Moscow

St. Basil's Cathedral

St. Basil's Cathedral

Posted by jamesh1066 12:38 Archived in Russia Comments (1)

Exploring rain soaked monastery caves

Car rental allows us to continue some of our exploration

rain 17 °C

Theoretically, today was to have been our last day in Moldova. The overnight train was to have taken us to Moscow that evening. However, with flights on the new One World airline S7 readily available, cheaply, we had decided to fly the following day.

Yet, this unplanned extra day in Chişinău brought little relief from the incessant rain. Completely against the ‘norm’ for this time of year, when temperatures typically reach a warm and sunny 35c drastic measures were called for. With a branch of Hertz located close to our new hotel (for we had to move out of the apartment) we rented a small but trusty Chevrolet, something or other. A horrible car to drive and ride in but one that would allow us to explore the country in luxurious dryness!

A rain swept village in Moldova

A rain swept village in Moldova

On the outskirts of Chişinău a sign reads ‘Welcome to Chişinău. The home of Europe’s worst roads’. This was by no means any exaggeration. Even within the capital undulations, potholes, dirt and flooding were the ‘normal’ road hazards. Yet, with Trey as my trusty navigator and a variety of tourist maps (some of which almost agreed on the capital’s road layouts) we headed out of the city and towards the main tourist sight of Moldova – the Orheiul Vechi Monastery Complex.

Orheiul Vechi Monastery Complex and Caves

Orheiul Vechi Monastery Complex and Caves

Some 25 miles north of Chişinău on a wild and rocky limestone cliff lay this remote place of worship. Beneath the Orthodox domed church, overlooking the gently meandering Răut river, lies the Cave Monastery. The complex was dug by Orthodox monks in the 13th-century and remained inhabited until the 18th-century. In 1996, a handful of monks returned to this secluded place of worship. It was a lone monk that we could see trudging from the road, along the crest of the cliff, as rain and wind lashed into his face. With no desire to follow this journey we admired the monastery and caves from the sanctuary of our little rental car. Whilst we were not able to explore the Caves, we had at least avoided the crowds. Apart from the monk we were the only souls making this popular journey today.

Wells for drawing water can be found alongside many main roads

Wells for drawing water can be found alongside many main roads

Returning to Chişinău a brief car tour around the city allowed us to at least view the Arc de Triomphe, Orthodox cathedral and Parliament House. However, with no appetite for a soaking walking tour of the capital we return to our hotel, hoping for a break in the weather.

Whilst evening did not bring a significant break in the weather, a slowing of the rain and our trusty pink and blue umbrellas did allow us to venture out to a downtown restaurant. Walking the tree lined boulevard of Ştefan cel Mare the city felt very French in style and character. The local language had a certain similarity to French, whilst the architectural styles reminded one of a provisional French town.

With soaking rain for essentially the entirety of our stay in Moldova we did not feel that our limited exploring had done justice to the country. However, we had still enjoyed our stay. Whilst the high price of accommodation and food, in what purports to be, the poorest country in Europe was an anathema to us the sobriquet of unhappiest country did not ring true. Those locals we had met seemed positive in their outlook. Often concerned about the standard of their English it was certainly much better than our Russian, which as our next destination, will hopefully improve!

Posted by jamesh1066 12:32 Archived in Moldova Comments (0)

Sunday, a day of leisure

Wind and rain dampen our explorer desires

rain 16 °C

Chişinău, Moldova

Waking to incessant rain, this Sunday morning was not one for exploring the somewhat limited sights of Chişinău. With few locals braving the worsening conditions we relaxed in our little Moldovan apartment with a leisurely porridge breakfast and a Podcast of Matthew Parris’ excellent Great Lives series.

With lunch fast approaching and no sign of the weather breaking we finally ventured out to a local restaurant for an excellent lunch of chicken livers followed by the supermarket, for essential and not-so-essential supplies. After previously, accidentally, purchasing ‘Kefir’, a popular fermented milk drink, that curdles when added to hot tea and essentially tastes like old milk we were more than a little ponderous of the milk-products section of the supermarket. However, with a variety of cow pictured cartons determining ‘milk’ was not obvious. To our rescue came a helpful, American, Peace Corp Volunteer. Having travelled into the ‘bright lights of the city’ from the village he was working at, this rare meeting proved highly fruitful, in terms of milk identification.

With sufficient groceries for a basic Sunday evening meal we returned to our little apartment, slightly damp and hopeful that tomorrow the ever worsening weather might finally improve.

Posted by jamesh1066 12:27 Archived in Moldova Comments (0)

Deported from a country that does not exist

The surreal ‘Republic of Transdniestr’ – a homage to the Soviet Union

rain 23 °C

Chişinău, Moldova

The gentle rain of the previous evening had grown more persistent overnight and was a most unwelcome sight this morning. Whilst the Central Bus Station was located only a mile from our apartment reaching it would prove to be a soaking experience. Unable to locate a bus stop we hail, what we are reliably told, will be a slightly corrupt taxi (typical of Chişinău) for the extremely short ride. With no English we ask for that universal destination ‘McDonalds’ knowing that it is close to the Bus Station. Unfortunately, the driver takes us to an alternate branch of this fast food chain, further away than our original location. With no, apparent, way to explain we want the Bus Station nor of correcting his mathematical errors in giving us our change we have little choice but to walk the now two miles to the Bus Station.

The Republic's flag

The Republic's flag

Arriving like the proverbial sodden rats we are soon on a dry minibus heading towards Tirapol, the capital of the breakaway Republic of Transdniestr. A veritable melee of cultural, political and economic turmoil engulfed Moldova after declaring independence, from the Soviet Union in 1991. As the former USSR collapsed, the Turkic Gaguaz and Soviet orientated Transdniestr declared their respective independence almost simultaneously. Following a bloody civil war, a shaky truce was declared, although the ‘Republic of Transdniestr’ still asserts independence from Moldova, recognized by no other country except Russia, who maintain a 5,000 strong ‘operational group’ to ensure this ‘independence’. With the military forces of Russia set against her Moldova has little choice but to accept the current situation or risk invasion in a similar manner and with similar excuses as Georgia in August 2008.

House of Soviets

House of Soviets

Today, the Transdniestr is a narrow strip of land covering some 2,000 miles on the eastern bank of the Nistru River – the world’s last surviving bastion to the Soviet Union and all it stood for. This idiosyncratic region has developed its own currency, police force, army and borders with Russian as the predominant language. Tourism is both encouraged and discouraged. Border officials will often state that tourists are ‘not welcome’ whilst official websites will boast of Transdniestr being ‘Europe’s hidden jewel’.

Nistru river

Nistru river

Lying some 50 miles east of Chişinău we were quickly at the official (but unrecognized by any other country, except Russia) border of Transdniestr. As the only tourists on the Bus we were soon asked to disembark and talk to the military clad border control guard. Our research for this trip had warned of numerous border ‘shakedowns’ with guards often demanding 200 USD fines for ‘Visas’ or infractions of fictitious rules. Tourists taken into huts with several looming armed guards where one’s infractions are documented, with indecipherable Cyrillic script. If you resist, bags are theatrically pulled from the Bus and a request to know how much cash you are carrying made, so that the size of your fine can be determined.

Transdniestr Stamps - Can only be used to send letters within the Republic

Transdniestr Stamps - Can only be used to send letters within the Republic

Knowledgeable of this process we were travelling light. A small bag and sufficient cash to cover only our direct needs for the day – which if we had to surrender in a fine would be worth the cost of the story! As it was the military clad guard, clutching our prized passports, wanted only to know if we had any coins from our home country. He was simply an avid collector. I had none but offered a 10 USD bill. This was eagerly re-buffed. Still amazed it was Trey who was able to offer a single ‘lucky’ one US cent coin that she was carrying. Happy with this new addition to his collection, our passports recovered, we returned to the Bus to await smokers to re-board and those staying in Transdniestr to complete their, separate, immigration process. A requirement we did not need to satisfy as we were staying in the Republic for less than 10 hours, or so we had been led to believe. What the actual, ever changing rules might be we will never know. However, it was this oversight that was to warrant our deporting when we subsequently tried to leave the Republic that afternoon.

Transdniestr Money - Only of use in the Republic

Transdniestr Money - Only of use in the Republic

Perversely disappointed that the anticipated Border irregularities had not occurred we soon reached Tiraspol, the capital of Transdniestr. Arriving later than anticipated our pre-arranged guide Julia was still waiting for us. Grateful that she had been forgiving of our tardiness, we began our tour. Whilst the capital is extremely poor on tourist sights the Soviet style buildings and statues of Lenin that pepper the main road were more than acceptable substitute. Starting at the Soviet style National Theatre, on ul 25 October, we continued on to a statue of Ukrainian poet Shevchenko where a small crowd had gathered, we know not why. As with the majority of locals that we pass the onlookers are dressed in drab, Soviet style clothing. With the Hammer and Sickle still forming part of the Transdniestr flag, the plethora of Soviet style buildings and the dour fashions, one almost expects an informal rendition of the ‘Red Flag’ or a KGB officer to approach at any moment. Yet, our guide Julia confirms that the Republic is not communist. Glorifying all things Soviet, capitalist cracks are showing on this Lenin loving idiosyncrasy. It is clear from the cars on the street, where battered Ladas reside next to brand new German Mercedes and BMWs, that the gulf between the different levels of society is widening.

Typical luxury Tiraspol apartments!

Typical luxury Tiraspol apartments!

Yet, for us our Tour continues as many have before – just with fewer sights! The House of Soviets, once again resplendent in Soviet architecture, has Lenin’s angry-looking bust peering out from prime position. Passing the Kvint factory we purchase some of Transdniestr’s proudest export. Since 1897 the Republic has been making some of Moldova’s finest brandy. A half liter of the ‘reserve’ Cognac costs us 30 roubles (the currency of Transdniestr that cannot be used or exchanged anywhere else!) which converts to about 3 USD. We have yet to taste any but are assured of a pleasant experience.

Soviet Tank at the War Memorial

Soviet Tank at the War Memorial

At the western end of ul 25 October lies perhaps Tiraspol’s most imposing monument. A Soviet tank (from Hungary) flies the Transdniestr flag. Behind is the War Memorial with its eternal flame at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier – remembering those who died on March 3rd 1992 during the first outbreak of the Civil War.

Eternal Flame at the War Memorial

Eternal Flame at the War Memorial

Progressing past military memorials and graves we reach three statues commemorating the Soviet War in Afghanistan, the Civil War and Mother Peace. Opposite is the Presidential Palace. Loitering and photography of the Palace is not permitted, so of course, we have to take pictures.

The Presidential Palace

The Presidential Palace

Photographs dutifully taken and without being caught we cross into Suvorov Square to view the statue of the Field Marshall we founded the modern city of Tiraspol, in 1792, with victory for Russia over the Ottoman Turks. One of the few generals in history who can claim never to have lost a battle his image can be found not only on statues but also the currency of the Republic. From here we walk through the Square to the Eastern Orthodox church of The Nativity. Built in the early 1990s the freshness and quality of the icons and fresco’s within the church are startling. Familiar with the faded images of comparable but much older churches this young place of worship provides a startling insight into how churches such at St. Sofia in Kiev must have appeared when first completed in the 11th century.

Inside the Cathedral

Inside the Cathedral

Throughout our tour Julia has been explaining these sights in a sporadic combination of English and German. Familiar with very rhythmic tours that often occur multiple times in the same day, Julia’s impromptu additions to our schedule are welcome. Expressing an interest, we visit the Post Office and Currency Exchange to obtain stamps and bank notes from this breakaway Republic. Neither stamps (which cannot be used to send letters outside of the Republic) nor bank notes are of any practical value outside of the Republic, however, they are an appropriate memory of this surreal Republic.

Our Tiraspol Guide - Julia

Our Tiraspol Guide - Julia

After a long morning of travel we opt for a late lunch at a popular café – 7 Fridays. The Republic’s version of TGI Friday’s, we assume! With Julia’s help, understanding and ordering from the Russian menu is straightforward, ensuring we are able to try, most importantly, the local Transdniestr beer (a Live beer, called ‘Old Palace’ that must be consumed within 10 days – no problem there!).

TGI Friday's Tiraspol Style

TGI Friday's Tiraspol Style

Our lunch is tasty and amazing value. Disappointed that we will not be able to return to this excellent culinary establishment we make our way to the Bus Station for our return to Chişinău. With Julia leaving us at the Station it is only when we reach the Border that problems arise.

Riding the bus in Tiraspol

Riding the bus in Tiraspol

The local bus

The local bus

A pretty Immigration officer dressed in the Soviet style of authoritarian official, orders us to get off the Bus at the Republic’s Border. We are quickly taken into the office of, what we assume to be, the Commander of the Border. He certainly appears upset with us. However, with no English his words mean little to us. Frustrated by our inability to understand his tirade a second, pretty Immigration Officer is brought into the relatively small office. Her English is much better. As Trey and I await the inevitable ‘Shake-Down’ we are told of our terrible crime. It would appear that on entering the Republic, earlier that morning, we should have completed an Immigration Form. Obviously, as someone in a military uniform had verified our Passports and allowed us to re-board the Bus we were unknowing of this requirement. Should we have completed the forms, on arrival, I am sure various ‘fees’ would have been required. As it was we were now in the Republic illegally and needed, therefore, to be deported.

Broken soda dispensers - no cans, just use your glass

Broken soda dispensers - no cans, just use your glass

As we were trying to leave the Republic anyway, neither Trey nor I, sounded much concern to this, especially as Transdniestr is not a country so deportation from the area would not affect our ability to enter any other country. As promised during our research long, undecipherable Cyrillic documents were placed in front of us which purported to be the documents required to deport us. Of course they could have been application forms for a new Supermarket Loyalty Card but we were assured that the matter was serious. Eager to rejoin our minibus, which given the animated comments from the Driver would depart soon with or without us, we confirmed that we were happy to be deported and that our minibus seemed like the perfect vehicle to affect this departure.

Appealing youth centre!

Appealing youth centre!

Aware that their threats were not overly concerning us the true and of course expected nature of the conversation began to surface. We would be allowed to leave without being deported, just this once, for the payment of a ‘fine’, in Transdniestr roubles. With our minibus to Chişinău now departed there was less urgency to extricate ourselves from this position. The ‘fine’ we finally fixed upon was 5 USD, each. However, with insufficient USD to pay this paltry amount the ‘fine’ was finally paid in the hated currency of Moldova, the Lei.

Once agreed our passport details and home addresses were taken down on scraps of paper to be ‘logged in the system’ or more likely thrown into the nearest rubbish bin as soon as we left the office. Should we enter Transdniestr again without completing an Immigration Card then we would be deported, we were sternly told. Still unsure where the downside of this agreement lay we were again given an official talking to about the need for an Immigration form, by the pretty Immigration Officer. More concerned that our infraction might have led to a missed passport stamp, my question on the matter, invoked yet another stilting diatribe before our passports were unceremoniously returned and we were cast out into the ‘No Man’s Land’ between the Republic and Moldova. Fortunately, and as expected another Minibus was completing Border formalities. Boarding we were soon on our way back to Chişinău having had the Border experience we had read about.

On previous journey’s we have been ‘shaken down’ predominately in Africa and Central America. In Africa, we were ‘shaken down’ twice in the same day, in separate countries for fictitious infractions. Yet, the practice, in our experience, is relatively rare in Europe. Today though must have been ‘shake down day’ for even our Minibus driver tried. Arriving at Chişinău Bus Station, the only passengers left, our disembarkation was blocked until we paid him for the journey. Having already paid in Tiraspol we showed our ticket. As this was for a different Bus he demanded we pay again. Clearly, as a ‘Cash for the Driver’ scheme we offered to go and pay at the Cashier, to solve the problem. Annoyed and frustrated at the realization that we would not just hand over money to him, directly, he waved us off with a Russian/Moldovan phrase that we were glad we could not interpret…for certain!

With the incessant rain having stopped, earlier in the day, when we arrived in Tiraspol our walk back to the apartment was simple and dry. As had been promised we had experienced the corrupt border guards of the Transdniestr but also seen the last bastion of Soviet Russia that remains in Europe. Perhaps not warranting the proffered title of ‘Europe’s Hidden Jewel’ in terms of its sights, the experience was as we had hoped surreal and admittedly unforgettable.

Local Market

Local Market

Posted by jamesh1066 12:04 Archived in Moldova Comments (0)

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